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Posts Tagged ‘Fermentation’

Gluten-Free, Sourdough Pita Bread

Makes 8

I’m truly delighted by these little, gluten-free, sourdough flat breads. They puff-up when baked, they’re perfect for pocket sandwiches, and they’re wonderful with hummus!

2 cups mature Gluten-Free Natural Levain Starter Culture

½ cup warm (about 100 degrees F), well, spring, or filtered water

1 ½ cups tapioca flour, plus more for rolling out the dough

1 tablespoon honey

1 tablespoon chia seeds

2 teaspoons xanthan gum

1 ½ cups sorghum flour

1 ½ teaspoons whole, unrefined sea salt

1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil

In a large bowl combine the mature starter, warm water, honey, chia seeds, and xanthan gum. Whisk until evenly combined, about 2 minutes. Add ½ cup of the sorghum flour and ½ cup of the tapioca flour at a time. Use a wooden spoon or the dough hook to mix incorporated. Add 1 teaspoon of olive oil. Mix until the oil has been absorbed into the dough, about 1 more minute. Scrape the dough into a ball. Lightly oil the mixing bowl. Turn the dough in the bowl to coat in the oil. Cover tightly. Set to rise in a warm (about 75 degrees F) place for 2 ½-3 hours, until nearly doubled in bulk.

Center the oven rack. Place a cookie sheet or jelly-roll pan in the cold oven. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F. Use a bench scraper or chef’s knife to cut the dough into eight equal portions. Lightly flour your hands, a work surface, and a rolling pin.  Form the dough into a ball. Flatten and roll into a round that is ¼-inch to 3/8-inch thick and about 6-inches in diameter.

Bake 3-4 breads per batch on the hot cookie sheet. After 3 minutes remove from the oven. Flip each bread. Use the flat side of a metal spatula to press down all of the bubbles in the pita (this actually helps the bubbles to expand). Return to the oven. Bake until puffy and barely browned, about 3-4 more minutes. Stack hot pita breads and wrap in a kitchen towel. This will keep them moist and warm for up to one hour. Serve while still warm. Store cooled pita tightly covered in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

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Streusel-Topped, Gluten-Free, Sourdough Coffee Cake

When:

Wednesday May 2, 2012; 6-7:30 p.m.

What:

Gluten-Free Sourdough Baking: How to Use Traditional Techniques with Gluten-Free Flours

Join me  for an evening of demonstrations, samples, and discussion. Learn to make your own sourdough starter, maintain an ongoing starter culture, and use it to leaven breads, cakes, and more! (Bring a small jar with a lid to take home your own starter.)

Where:

People’s Food Co-Op – In the Community Room

Everyone is Welcome!

3029 SE 21st Avenue

Portland, Oregon

Cost:

Free

Please call the People’s Co-Op to register, 503-674-2642.

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When:

Wednesday May 2, 2012; 6-7:30 p.m.

What:

Gluten-Free Sourdough Baking: How to Use Traditional Techniques with Gluten-Free Flours

Join me  for an evening of demonstrations, samples, and discussion. Learn to make your own sourdough starter, maintain an ongoing starter culture, and use it to leaven breads, cakes, and more! (Bring a small jar with a lid to take home your own starter.)

Where:

People’s Food Co-Op – In the Community Room

Everyone is Welcome!

Gluten-free natural levain starter

3029 SE 21st Avenue

Portland, Oregon

Cost:

Free

Please call the People’s Co-Op to register, 503-674-2642.

Links to some of the techniques & recipes featured in the class:

Gluten-Free Natural Levain (Natural Leaven, Sourdough) Starter Culture

Artisan Sourdough Bread Recipe, Gluten-Free 

Gluten-Free Sourdough Coffee Cake Recipe

Gluten-Free Sourdough Pancakes

Upcoming Free Event at People’s Co-Op:

Wednesday July 11, 6-7:30

Fermented Drinks: How to Make Refreshing, Probiotic Tonics

Beet Kvass

Learn to make kombucha tea, beet kvass, and a lacto-fermented fruit juice. These drinks are inexpensive, nutritious, and easy to make in your own kitchen!

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Flower Power Kombucha

Makes 2 ½  quarts

This combination of fragrant, uplifting, and naturally sweet flowers is the perfect tonic for spring. Rose petals soothe and relax; St. John’s Wort is detoxifies the liver; red clover purifies the blood; and chrysanthemum is anti-inflammatory and aids digestion. (See cooks notes for contraindications for these herbs.)

Before you make herbal kombucha set aside a mother mushroom that has not been in contact with herbal brew. The addition of herbs may change the composition of bacteria and yeast in the s.c.o.b.y.. Discard any mother or daughter mushrooms that have been in herbal teas or use them to culture future batches of herbal brews (but not regular brews (see cooks note)). If you are making kombucha to maximize the specific health benefits that are associated with the tea please follow the recipe for 5-Step Kombucha.

3 quarts clean water (well, spring, or filtered)

1 cup evaporated cane juice (preferably organic and fairly traded)

3 tablespoons organic rose petals

1 tablespoon St. John’s Wort blossoms and leaves

1 tablespoon red clover blossoms, about 3 large

1 tablespoon chrysanthemum blossoms, about 3 large

1 tablespoon organic green tea

½ cup finished kombucha or ¼ cup apple cider vinegar

1 kombucha mushroom (s.c.o.b.y.)

1.            Bring one quart of the water to a boil. Pour the water into a one-gallon heat safe glass bowl or jar. Add the sugar and stir until dissolved. Add the herbs and tea to a muslin spice bag, or oversized tea bag. Steep the mixture for as little as 15 minutes, or until the tea is cool. Remove the tea bag. Add the remaining 2 quarts of water.

2.            Add ½ cup kombucha from a previous batch or ¼ cup apple cider vinegar (this acidifies the tea and prevents contamination from other microorganisms). Place the mushroom dark side down in the liquid.

3.            If you are using a bowl cross several strips of masking tape over the top (to keep the cover from falling into the liquid). Cover with a cloth or paper towel. Secure the cover tightly with a string or rubber band (insects may be attracted and must be kept out!). Label with the date made. Store in a warm, well-ventilated place, out of direct sunlight.

4.            Depending upon the room temperature, the kombucha will be ready after 6-12 days. Kombucha is ready to drink when it looks relatively translucent and a ‘baby’ kombucha mushroom has formed above the mother. It will cease tasting of tea. Most people prefer kombucha sweet to pleasingly tart. After it has fermented about one week taste it daily. When the flavor suits your taste, bottle the tea.

5.            To bottle kombucha, remove the mother and the baby mushroom from the brew. Use a funnel and glass jars or bottles with tightly fitting lids (or flip-top bottles). Fill the jars to the top. Place a sheet of wax paper underneath the lid. (The paper prevents the acidic kombucha from contacting the lid.) Store in the refrigerator.

To restore effervescence to chilled kombucha, remove from the refrigerator for 15 minutes. Strain the tea just before serving.

Cooks note:

The mother and baby mushroom can be separated and used to make additional batches of flower power or other herbal kombuchas. Don’t use them for regular kombucha because the balance of bacteria and yeast within the s.c.o.b.y. may be altered.

Don’t use rose petals if you are pregnant. Don’t use chrysanthemum if you have a known allergy to ragweed. Don’t use St. John’s Wort if you are pregnant or nursing, or if you take any of the following medications: cyclosporine, tacrolimus, irinotecan, and imatinib mesylate, protease inhibitors, or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Don’t use red clover if you are pregnant or nursing, taking oral contraception, estrogen or progesterone therapies.

This post was shared at Real Food Forager’s Fat Tuesday, Kelly the Kitchen Kop’s Real Food Wednesday, and Nourishing Gourmet’s Pennywise platter Thursday blog hop.

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When:

Tuesday April 10th, 2012; 6-7:30 p.m.

What:

Flavored Kombucha: How to Make your Favorites at Home

Join me  for an evening of discussion, demonstrations, and samples! Learn the basics of brewing delicious kombucha tea. Plus, learn how to add your favorite juices, fruits, and herbs.

Enter to win a kombucha starter kit complete with everything needed to get started brewing. (The kit includes a one-gallon jar, cloth cover, funnel, strainer, organic tea, organic sugar, and a starter culture.)

The class fee includes: recipe packet; kombucha samples; gluten-free, vegan snacks; your own kombucha starter; and entry to win the kit. Bring a half-pint mason jar (or similar container) with a tightly fitting lid to transport the culture.

Class space is limited. Please contact Dori at DoriOliver@gmail.com to register (or if you have questions about the class).


Where:

People’s Food Co-Op – In the Community Room

Everyone is Welcome!

3029 SE 21st Avenue

Portland, Oregon

Cost:

$ 12

Please contact Dori at DoriOliver@gmail.com   to register.

Links to some of the techniques & recipes featured in the class:

Flavored Kombucha: How to make Your Favorites at Home

Simple Secrets of Carbonated Kombucha

5-Step Kombucha Recipe 

View the original announcement here or join this event on facebook.


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When:

Tuesday April 10th, 2012; 6-7:30 p.m.

What:

Flavored Kombucha: How to Make your Favorites at Home

Join me  for an evening of discussion, demonstrations, and samples! Learn the basics of brewing delicious kombucha tea. Plus, learn how to add your favorite juices, fruits, and herbs.

Enter to win a kombucha starter kit complete with everything needed to get started brewing. (The kit includes a one-gallon jar, cloth cover, funnel, strainer, organic tea, organic sugar, and a starter culture.)

The class fee includes: recipe packet; kombucha samples; gluten-free, vegan snacks; your own kombucha starter; and entry to win the kit. Bring a half-pint mason jar (or similar container) with a tightly fitting lid to transport the culture.

Class space is limited. Please contact Dori at DoriOliver@gmail.com to register (or if you have questions about the class).


Where:

People’s Food Co-Op – In the Community Room

Everyone is Welcome!

3029 SE 21st Avenue

Portland, Oregon

Cost:

$ 12

Please contact Dori at DoriOliver@gmail.com   to register.

Links to some of the techniques & recipes featured in the class:

Flavored Kombucha: How to make Your Favorites at Home

Simple Secrets of Carbonated Kombucha

5-Step Kombucha Recipe 

Gluten-Free Natural Levain Bread

Upcoming Free Events at People’s Co-Op:

Wednesday May 2,

6-7:30

Gluten-Free Sourdough Baking: How to Use Traditional Techniques with Gluten-Free Flours

Learn to make your own sourdough starter, maintain an ongoing starter culture, and use it to leaven breads, cakes, and more! (Bring a small jar with a lid to take home your own starter.)

Wednesday July 11, 6-7:30

Fermented Drinks: How to Make Refreshing, Probiotic Tonics

Beet Kvass

Learn to make kombucha tea, beet kvass, and a lacto-fermented fruit juice. These drinks are inexpensive, nutritious, and easy to make in your own kitchen!

Read Full Post »

Gluten-Free Third Bread

Makes 1 loaf

This bread is made with a combination of three, whole-grain, gluten-free flours – thus each flour is one-third of the bread!  Soaking the flours overnight increases the digestibility (and palatability) of the whole grains. This recipe uses ginger powder to increase the probiotic content of the soaking water and hasten fermentation of the grains. The result is a 100% whole grain, gum-free, easily digestible, tender, delicious, sandwich bread.

1 ¼ cups brown rice flour

1 ¼ cups sorghum flour

1 ¼ cups millet flour

½  teaspoon organic, dried ginger powder

2 cups warm (about 100 degrees F) water

2/3 cup flax meal

1 teaspoon finely ground, unrefined sea salt

1 tablespoon whole cane, date, or palm sugar

1 teaspoon active dry yeast

2 tablespoons olive oil or ghee, plus more for greasing the pan

In a large glass or ceramic mixing bowl combine the brown rice flour, sorghum flour, millet flour, warm water, and ginger. Use a wooden spoon to mix until a smooth batter forms. Cover tightly with a non-reactive lid. Leave in a warm (75-80 degrees F) place overnight, about 12-24 hours.

Generously grease a standard (4 ½” x 8 ½ ” x 3”) glass loaf pan. Add the flax meal, salt, sugar, and yeast to the soaked flour mixture. Use a wooden spoon or the paddle attachment to stir the batter until a fluffy dough forms, about 2 minutes. Add the oil or ghee. Stir until it becomes fully incorporated, about 1 minute. Scoop the batter into the greased bread pan. Cover with a light (flour-sack style) towel or cloth napkin. Set to raise in a warm (75 -80 degrees F) place until even with the top of the pan, about 30-45 minutes.

Center the oven rack. Pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees F. Bake until slightly browned on top, about, 70-80 minutes. Remove the finished bread from the pan. Cool on a rack. Store tightly covered at room temperature if you plan to eat the bread over 1-2 days. Store tightly covered in the refrigerator up to 5 days. For longer storage wrap with wax paper, place in a freezer bag, and store in the freezer up to 2 weeks.

This post was shared on Fat Tuesday, Slightly Indulgent Tuesday & Real Food Wednesday!

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